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Mastering Linear Time

Mastering Linear Time workshop, script for Section 4

Title slide

This is section 4 of five sections in the workshop on mastering linear time.

A measure of time stress

We can take a simple measure of time stress, so we can compare levels of stress that we experience, and then learn to control the stress.

On a scale from 0-10, where 0 = the least and 10 = the most, how much stress do you feel about time right now?  Make a mental note about what this number is right now.

Swimming in Space

Slides:

1:   Stand with feet apart, and arms stretched out in front at shoulder height.  Slowly move one arm up a little while moving the other arm down. . . . 10 secs

Gradually extend the movement until finally each arm moves straight up and down. Attend to the sense or feeling of space.  . . . . 50 secs

Continue 3 minutes . . .

—————–

2: Slowly decrease the range of the movement until your arms are still, extended in front at shoulder height. . . . 50 secs

Slowly lower them to your sides, and stand quietly for a few minutes, expanding your sensations and feelings. . . . 2 mins

——————-

3: Slowly lift your straight arms in front of you until they are overhead with the palms facing forward.  Bend down from the waist until your fingers almost touch the floor. . . . 45 secs

Swing up slowly until your back is straight and your arms are outstretched overhead. . . . 45 secs

Continue this slow swinging movement, down and up, three times. . . . 2 mins

————-

4: Lower your arms to your sides, and sit for five minutes, expanding the sensations quickened by this movement. . . . 5 mins

Recording:

1: Now we’ll do a slow movement exercise called “Swimming in Space,” which can help us relax, balance our energies, and relieve time pressure.

Stand with feet apart, and arms stretched out in front at shoulder height, palms down.  Breathing easily through both nose and mouth, simultaneously very slowly move one arm up and the other arm down, keeping arms and hands straight. First don’t move the arms very far. Gradually extend the movement until finally each arm moves straight up and down.. . . . [pause 45 secs]

Continue 3 minutes. Pay attention to the particular sense of space; you may feel a quality like swimming.

—————

2: Slowly decrease the range of the movement until your arms are still, extended in front at shoulder height. . . . 50 secs

Slowly lower them to your sides, and stand quietly for a few minutes, expanding your sensations and feelings. . . . 2 mins

—————-

3: Slowly lift your straight arms in front of you until they are overhead with the palms facing forward.  Moving your arms, head, and torso together, bend down from the waist until your fingers almost touch the floor. . . . 45 secs

Swing up slowly until your back is straight and your arms are outstretched overhead. . . . 45 secs

Continue this slow swinging movement, down and up, three times. . . . 2 mins

——————-

4: Lower your arms to your sides, and sit for five minutes, expanding the sensations quickened by this movement. . . . 5 mins

Notes:

Swimming in Space, pp. 218-19, Kum Nye Relaxation, Part 2

Stand well balanced with your feet a comfortable distance apart, your back straight, and your arms stretched out in front of you at shoulder height, palms down.  Breathing easily through both nose and mouth, with your belly relaxed, simultaneously move one arm up and the other arm down, keeping the arms and hands straight and relaxed.

Move very slowly.  At first do not move the arms very far—then gradually extend the movement until finally each arm moves up and down as far as it can go.  At the furthest points of the movement, relax the back of the neck and head.  Pay attention to the particular sense of space awakened by this exercise; you may feel a quality like swimming.

Continue the full movement of the arms for three to five minutes, then slowly decrease the range of the movement until your arms are still, and extended in front of you at shoulder height.  Slowly lower them to your sides, and stand quietly for a few minutes, expanding your sensations and feelings.

Now slowly lift your arms in front of you until they are overhead with the palms facing forward.  Keep your arms parallel to each other and straight.  Moving your arms, head, and torso together, bend down from the waist until your fingers almost touch the floor; then swing up slowly until your back is straight and your arms are outstretched overhead.

Continue this slow swinging movement, down and up, three or nine times.  Be sure to keep the arms straight throughout the movement.  To complete the exercise, lower your arms to your sides from the overhead position, and sit in the sitting posture for five to ten minutes, expanding the sensations quickened by this movement.

Moments between Moments

Observe the flow of time from one moment to the next. . . .

You may notice that between two initially observed moments A and B lie other, intermediate moments . . .

Practice observing from moment to moment in a way that makes available, on an ever ‘smaller’ scale, moments ‘between’ moments. . . .

———————-

Observe in your own experience the flow of time from one moment to the next. If the mind is calm and alert, you may notice that between two initially observed moments A and B lie other, intermediate moments:

Practice observing from moment to moment in a way that makes available, on an ever ‘smaller’ scale, moments ‘between’ moments.  LOK exercise 14, p. 119

“By learning to be sensitive to the infinity of ‘time’ available within any clock-time period, we can begin to appreciate more fully the value and possibilities life presents. We can begin by noticing more time, more available moments, and then later we can have a more intimate experience with ‘time’.” (Dimensions of Thought, p. 43)

Going without Going

Slide:

Look straight ahead and walk as slowly as you can, lifting each foot about six inches off the ground. . .

Now walk at half that speed. . . . Let the body  be  light  and  pervaded  by  space, breathing very gently through both mouth and nose.  . . .

Slow down even more. Point the toes of the ‘lead foot’ upward before lifting the foot. On the downward motion the toes touch the floor first.  . . .

Let go of the emphasis on your doing it.  You may discover that your body moves gently by itself.

Recording:

Remove your shoes or put on light slippers.  Looking straight ahead, walk slowly by lifting each foot about six inches above the ground. Walk as slowly as you can. . . . [pause 45 secs]

Now walk at half that speed. . . . Let the body  be  light  and  pervaded  by  space, breathing very gently through both mouth and nose.  . . . [pause 45 secs]

Slow down even more. Point the toes of the ‘lead foot’ upward before lifting the foot. On the downward motion the toes touch the floor first.  . . . [pause 45 secs]

Even the  slightest  experience  or  sensation is important . . . infinite, in fact.   Let go of the emphasis on your doing it and let all the experienced movements be seen as given by ‘time’.  You may discover that your body moves gently by itself. . . . [pause 12 mins]

———————

Remove your shoes or put on light, thin-soled slippers.  Stand  erect,  with  your  spine  straight  and  your hands relaxed at your sides. While keeping your upper torso erect and looking straight ahead, practice walking slowly by lifting each foot four to seven inches above the ground and stepping forward gently. Walk as slowly as you can. Now walk at only half that speed (yes, you can do it). Then slow down even more. Modify the walking technique by lifting or pointing the toes of the ‘lead foot’ upward before actually lifting the foot. On the downward motion the toes should touch the floor first.

If  you  are  having  trouble  with  your  balance,  relax your  shoulders,  throat,  and  heart  areas.  Perfect  balance will come as you let go of the emphasis on your doing it and let all the experienced movements be seen as given by ‘time’. [“You may discover that your body moves gently by itself.” Kum Nye Relaxation, Part 2, p. 173] Relax your body’s weightiness—let it  be  light  and  pervaded  by  space.  Finally, leave  your mouth slightly open and your throat unblocked, so that you are breathing very gently through both your mouth and nose.  The ultra slow pace will help put you in touch with every  minute  aspect  of  the  process  of  walking—the pressure of your foot on the floor, the lessening of this pressure, further lessening, rising through an arc, moving  forward,  almost  touching  the  floor  again,  barely touching,  etc.  Even  the  slightest  experience  or  sensation is important . . . infinite, in fact.  TSK, p. 185

Seeing through Negativity

‘Negative’ is often just a label atop neutral energy

Arms straight out to the sides

Breathe easily through nose and mouth, with tip of tongue on upper palate a little behind front teeth

Relax all muscles you don’t need to use

Find center of ‘negative’ feeling, or breathe ‘from it’; merge with it

See if ‘negative’ character changes

‘Negative’ is a way of perceiving from outside

——————-

Recording:

When young, we learn to avoid ‘negative’ sensations and feelings, and  intensify our sense of time passing over many years.

We can do a simple physical exercise that may help us see how the word ‘negative’ is often just a label on top of inherently neutral energy. Stand and put your arms straight out to the sides.  See whether you can keep the arms there for a minute or two, and breathe easily through nose and mouth, with the tip of the tongue on the upper palate a little behind the front teeth.  Relax all the muscles you don’t need to use to hold this position.  . . .

Before long you might feel some tension or pain.  If so, while being aware of the feeling, breathe lightly through your mouth and nose, inhaling and exhaling gently and evenly. . . . A negative feeling tends to fragment one’s awareness and cause a lot of thinking about how to get away from the feeling.  Try to focus lightly on the ‘center of the feeling’.  Be aware of the feeling as if you were a spot of awareness inside the feeling itself. You might also try to breathe ‘from the feeling’; or to merge with it.

When you change your perspective in one of these ways, see if the so-called ‘negative’ character changes. Experiment in this way for a minute or so, if you can. Does the word ‘negative’ describe a way of perceiving a feeling from outside?

——————–

When young, we learn to avoid ‘negative’ sensations and feelings, and  intensify our sense of time passing over many years.

I remember driving home from Yosemite National Park on a very hot day.  My young son Dylan was in the back seat, and he was wiggling around trying to get comfortable in the heat.  But he couldn’t get away from the heat.  Then he said, “I can’t wait till we get home.”  He couldn’t physically escape from the heat, so he distanced himself ‘internally’ from it. Instead of just feeling it and not taking a position on it, he observed and took a point of view apart from the sensations, and then the sense of time passing grew stronger, leading him to say, “I can’t wait till we get home.” He was visualizing a preferable future time that was separate from the present.  Distancing himself from the heat intensified the unpleasant, slow feeling of time passing.  Time was a mirror reflecting his way of looking at the heat.

We can do a simple physical exercise that may help us see how the word ‘negative’ is often just a label on top of inherently neutral energy. Stand and put your arms straight out to the sides.  See whether you can keep the arms there for a minute or two, and breathe easily through nose and mouth, with the tip of the tongue on the upper palate a little behind the front teeth.  Relax all the muscles you don’t need to use to hold this position.

Before long you might feel some tension or pain.  If so, while being aware of the feeling, breathe lightly through your mouth and nose, inhaling and exhaling gently and evenly. . . . A negative feeling tends to fragment one’s awareness and cause a lot of thinking about how to get away from the feeling.  Try to focus lightly on the ‘center of the feeling’, whatever that might mean to you.  Be aware of the feeling as if you were a spot of awareness inside the feeling itself. You might also try to breathe ‘from the feeling’; or to merge with it.

When you change your perspective in one of these ways, see if the so-called ‘negative’ character changes. Experiment in this way for a minute or so, if you can. Does the word ‘negative’ describe a way of perceiving a feeling from outside?

A measure of time stress

We can once again take a simple measure of time stress, so we can compare levels of stress that we experience, and then learn to control the stress.

On a scale from 0-10, where 0 = the least and 10 = the most, how much stress do you feel about time right now?

Make a mental note of this number. How does it compare to the number you estimated earlier in the course?

The End of Section Four of Five

This is the end of the fourth of five workshop sections.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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