A Peak Performance weblog

Mastering Linear Time

Mastering Linear Time workshop, script for Section 3

Title slide

This is section 3 of five sections in the workshop on mastering linear time.

A measure of time stress

We can take a simple measure of time stress, so we can compare levels of stress that we experience, and then learn to control the stress.

On a scale from 0-10, where 0 = the least and 10 = the most, how much stress do you feel about time right now?  Make a mental note about what this number is right now.

Clock Watching – A New Way?

We can experiment a bit more with personal time and do an exercise to see how it changes.

This clock watching exercise directly balances the throat energy center, where imbalance seems to produce pressure and anxiety about time.  It also balances left and right brain hemispheres.

Set up your environment so that you have ten minutes when you won’t be interrupted or distracted.  When the timer starts, just relax and watch the timer’s hand move. Breathe easily, gently, and smoothly through both nose and mouth, with the tip of your tongue on the upper palate just in back of your front teeth.  As you continue, see if you can let the breath become more and more even and continuous.   Also, see whether the sense of distance normally felt between yourself and the timer can be minimized.

Timer slide

Clock Watching and Breathing

OK.

During the clock watching exercise,

Did the sense of time pressure and anxiety decrease?

Did the feeling of time change? If so, how?

Did every minute seem equally long?

How were pressure and anxiety related to the flow of time?

You can practice this way of breathing as often as you can remember it. After a month or so, your whole energy level and sense of balance and relaxation will probably change.

 

Going without Going

Slide:

Look straight ahead and walk as slowly as you can, lifting each foot about six inches off the ground. . .

Now walk at half that speed. . . . Let the body  be  light  and  pervaded  by  space, breathing very gently through both mouth and nose.  . . .

Slow down even more. Point the toes of the ‘lead foot’ upward before lifting the foot. On the downward motion the toes touch the floor first.  . . .

Let go of the emphasis on your doing it.  You may discover that your body moves gently by itself.

Recording:

Remove your shoes or put on light slippers.  Looking straight ahead, walk slowly by lifting each foot about six inches above the ground. Walk as slowly as you can. . . . [pause 45 secs]

Now walk at half that speed. . . . Let the body  be  light  and  pervaded  by  space, breathing very gently through both mouth and nose.  . . . [pause 45 secs]

Slow down even more. Point the toes of the ‘lead foot’ upward before lifting the foot. On the downward motion the toes touch the floor first.  . . . [pause 45 secs]

Even the  slightest  experience  or  sensation is important . . . infinite, in fact.   Let go of the emphasis on your doing it and let all the experienced movements be seen as given by ‘time’.  You may discover that your body moves gently by itself. . . . [pause 12 mins]

———————

Remove your shoes or put on light, thin-soled slippers.  Stand  erect,  with  your  spine  straight  and  your hands relaxed at your sides. While keeping your upper torso erect and looking straight ahead, practice walking slowly by lifting each foot four to seven inches above the ground and stepping forward gently. Walk as slowly as you can. Now walk at only half that speed (yes, you can do it). Then slow down even more. Modify the walking technique by lifting or pointing the toes of the ‘lead foot’ upward before actually lifting the foot. On the downward motion the toes should touch the floor first.

If  you  are  having  trouble  with  your  balance,  relax your  shoulders,  throat,  and  heart  areas.  Perfect  balance will come as you let go of the emphasis on your doing it and let all the experienced movements be seen as given by ‘time’. [“You may discover that your body moves gently by itself.” Kum Nye Relaxation, Part 2, p. 173] Relax your body’s weightiness—let it  be  light  and  pervaded  by  space.  Finally, leave  your mouth slightly open and your throat unblocked, so that you are breathing very gently through both your mouth and nose.  The ultra slow pace will help put you in touch with every  minute  aspect  of  the  process  of  walking—the pressure of your foot on the floor, the lessening of this pressure, further lessening, rising through an arc, moving  forward,  almost  touching  the  floor  again,  barely touching,  etc.  Even  the  slightest  experience  or  sensation is important . . . infinite, in fact.  TSK, p. 185

Abiding in Thought

Now we’ll do an exercise from the book Dynamics of Time and Space, an exercise called “Abiding in Thought.”

“On the surface of experience, thoughts come and go quickly, even instantaneously. One event succeeds another, one reaction follows the next in a powerful momentum that structures linear time. Let yourself become aware of this dynamic and the rhythm that supports it. . . . [pause]

Gradually introduce a different rhythm: As a single feeling or emotion or thought arises, enter into it and abide there—as though you would be ready to live your life right within that experience. . . [pause]

This abiding is not static. It invokes the dynamic rhythm of time without insisting on a linear momentum. . . .

As you sink into the experience, time expands. . . .”

[not read:]

“If we know how to look, the  caring  or support immediately available within  each  of  the   moments which  combine   to  constitute    our  lives.  The  humble  moment,  when  seen as time,  space,  and knowledge,  is a target worth  aiming  at. It’s  the  vital  center  of the universe;  if we hit  it,  we  explode   everything    that   prevents    fulfillment,  attaining   everything   that  fulfills.” (Tarthang Tulku, Dimensions of Thought, p. xlvi-xlvii)

“With sufficient appreciation of our actually being ‘time’, we—or ‘knowingness’—can abide forever within the smallest duration of clock-time.” (Dimensions of Thought, p. 43)

Moments between Moments

Observe the flow of time from one moment to the next. . . .

You may notice that between two initially observed moments A and B lie other, intermediate moments . . .

Practice observing from moment to moment in a way that makes available, on an ever ‘smaller’ scale, moments ‘between’ moments. . . .

———————-

The original text:

Observe in your own experience the flow of time from one moment to the next. If the mind is calm and alert, you may notice that between two initially observed moments A and B lie other, intermediate moments:

Practice observing from moment to moment in a way that makes available, on an ever ‘smaller’ scale, moments ‘between’ moments.  LOK exercise 14, p. 119

“By learning to be sensitive to the infinity of ‘time’ available within any clock-time period, we can begin to appreciate more fully the value and possibilities life presents. We can begin by noticing more time, more available moments, and then later we can have a more intimate experience with ‘time’.” (Dimensions of Thought, p. 43)

A measure of time stress

We can once again take a simple measure of time stress, so we can compare levels of stress that we experience, and then learn to control the stress.

On a scale from 0-10, where 0 = the least and 10 = the most, how much stress do you feel about time right now?

Make a mental note of this number. How does it compare to the number you estimated earlier in the course?

The End of Section Three of Five

This is the end of the third of five workshop sections.

Please go for a walk and when you return, make a few notes about your current experience, and especially your experience of time. It seems we often don’t notice changes after this kind of workshop until we leave our typical environment and walk around somewhere else.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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